People & Society |
Djirra

Voice and visibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women at Sydney Peace Prize

15 November 2019

 

Voice and visibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women at Sydney Peace Prize

Antoinette Braybrook, Djirra CEO, shared the stage last night with Me Too Movement leaders Tarana Burke and Tracey Spicer AM at the annual Sydney Peace Prize Award Ceremony.

Me Too is a powerful thunderclap from women around the world against a particular form of injustice. But for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, Me Too is not enough,” Ms Braybrook said.

“As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, we fight every day against systemic racism, institutionalised violence and the stigma associated with being Black in this country.”

Today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 34 times more likely to be hospitalised because of family violence and 10 times more likely to die from a violent assault than other women.

Tracey Spicer has generously donated her share of the prize to Djirra to support real change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children. Djirra will also facilitate a conversation with Tarana Burke and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women on 18 November in Melbourne.

“Our governments claim violence against women is a national priority, but here are the facts. We welcome the recent funding commitment from the Federal Government for our frontline work until 2023 but our organisations are in crisis. We have not received a real increase in the past 6 years to properly meet increased costs of vital frontline services for women and children’s safety”.

“Our national body that represents the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children experiencing family violence still has no funding certainty from our Federal Government beyond 30 June next year. We are the only body that represents the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children on family violence and we are at risk of losing our voice and visibility. Our voices must be at the centre of the national conversations not side lined and not shut out”, Ms Braybrook said.

“Self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and all of our people is the only true way forward. It is essential to centre our voices and our visibility. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women Me Too is powerful, but it is not enough. It’s me too, but it must be Us Too.” 

 To support Aboriginal self-determination and Aboriginal-led solutions, donate to https://tinyurl.com/givetodjirra 

Media contact: Amanda Bresnan, 0448 060 765, abresnan@djirra.org.au

Twitter @DjirraVic

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