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Hay fever (allergic rhinitis) is less about sneezing and more about the serious impact on sleep, relationships and health

 

EMBARGOED WEDS 26 SEPTEMBER

Hay fever (allergic rhinitis) is less about sneezing and more about the serious impact on sleep, relationships and health

 

Of Australians surveyed, who suffer from moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis1:

  • Nine out of ten experience sleep issues
  • Relationships are impacted, with some couples forced to sleep in separate bedrooms
  • One in three take up to nine days’ sick leave per year
  • While desperate for relief, half of sufferers just put up with it

 

SYDNEY, Australia – September 26, 2018: Experts* are urging Australians to act on allergic rhinitis and take it far more seriously with new research1 showing it’s having a significant impact on the quality of sufferers’ lives. Results from a YouGov Galaxy poll** released today by Mylan Health Pty Ltd reveal nine out of ten (93%) moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis sufferers are struggling to get a good night’s sleep due to their symptoms and half (49%) are exhausted all the time. This is not surprising considering one third (30%) wake up because they cannot breathe from congestion, more than one third (41%) wake up to blow their nose, and one in five (19%) experience asthma flare-ups1.

Almost 4.5 million people suffer from allergic rhinitis2, Australia’s most common allergic disorder3 – and it is most likely to occur in 25-44 year olds, a prime time for career and family life3. In addition to the burdensome symptoms caused by allergic rhinitis, when it’s poorly controlled, it can lead to asthma3.

Allergic rhinitis also takes its toll during the day, as over half (53%) of moderate-to-severe sufferers with a partner say it has impacted their relationship, and one third (37%) have taken up to nine days’ sick leave over the past year as a result of the condition1.

Dr. Kwok Yan, Consultant Physician in Allergy, Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (Camperdown, NSW), said the term hay fever makes many believe it’s a temporary and minor ailment, and that people tend to trivialise it.

“The reality is allergic rhinitis can be a very debilitating medical condition and symptoms can have a significant impact on sleep, concentration, learning and daily function – but these effects are not always linked back to the nose. People need to recognise the direct connection between their nasal symptoms and reduced quality of life” he said.

Maria Said, CEO of Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia, said that although many sufferers are desperate for relief, they have almost given up on finding an effective solution for their condition.

“It’s worrying that despite the substantial impact, half (56%) of those surveyed said they are just used to the condition and deal with their symptoms as best they can, and half (50%) would only seek GP advice if symptoms worsen,” she said.

Experts* are calling on allergic rhinitis sufferers to see their doctor or healthcare professional about their nose – not just during Spring but throughout the year – to help manage persistent symptoms and reduce the significant impact on their health, productivity and quality of life.

“If you’re struggling with persistent symptoms it’s very important to take a proactive approach and see a healthcare professional for advice,” added Dr Yan.

“As well as making you feel much better, it could even save your relationship!” he added.

 

Additional Research Findings:

·         One in five (18%) with moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis are resigned to the fact they will always have symptoms.

·         Sufferers say allergic rhinitis impairs daily activities (40%), work (21%), sport and leisure (32%).

·         Social activities are also challenging with 13% of sufferers of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis avoiding socialising.

·         For those in a relationship, over half (53%) say that their relationship with their partner is impacted – and one in ten (10%) sleep in separate bedrooms due to symptoms and restless sleep.

 

 Notes to editor:

Dr Kwok Yan has served on advisory boards sponsored by Mylan for which he has received compensation. In relation to this Mylan media announcement, no compensation was provided to Dr Yan, and the opinions expressed are his own.

Maria Said has served on advisory boards sponsored by Mylan for which she has received compensation. In relation to this Mylan media announcement, no compensation was provided to Ms Said, and the opinions expressed are her own.

 

*Allergic rhinitis expert panel

·         Professor Richard Harvey, Rhinologist at Macquarie University and St Vincent’s Hospital

·         Dr. Kwok Yan, Consultant Physician in Allergy, Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and Australian and New Zealand Rhinologic Society Secretary

·         Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich, Professor Team Leader, Quality Use of Respiratory Medicines Group, University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Woolcock Institute

·         Maria Said, CEO of Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia


**About the research

The consumer research study was conducted by Galaxy Newspoll using an online permission based panel between Thursday 21 June and Monday 25 June 2018 with 1,000 Australians aged 18 years and over who suffered from hay fever or allergic rhinitis and exhibited at least one of four persistent symptoms.


References

1.    Galaxy Newspoll Consumer research June 2018. Mylan data on file

2.    Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Allergic Rhinitis (‘hay fever’) Web Report 2016. Available at: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/asthma-other-chronic-respiratory-conditions/allergic-rhinitis-hay-fever/contents/allergic-rhinitis-by-the-numbers. Accessed September 2018

3.    Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA), Information for Health Professionals, Allergic Rhinitis Clinical update 2017. Available at: https://www.allergy.org.au/images/stories/pospapers/ar/ASCIA_HP_Clinical_Update_Allergic_Rhinitis_2017.pdf. Accessed September 2018.


About Mylan

Mylan is a global pharmaceutical company committed to setting new standards in healthcare. Working together around the world to provide 7 billion people access to high quality medicine, we innovate to satisfy unmet needs; make reliability and service excellence a habit; do what’s right, not what’s easy; and impact the future through passionate global leadership. We offer a growing portfolio of more than 7,500 marketed products around the world, including antiretroviral therapies on which more than 40% of people being treated for HIV/AIDS globally depend. We market our products in more than 165 countries and territories. We are one of the world’s largest producers of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Every member of our approximately 35,000-strong workforce is dedicated to creating better health for a better world, one person at a time.

MYLAN® is a registered trade mark of Mylan Inc. Copyright© 2018 Mylan N.V All rights reserved. Mylan Health Pty Ltd. Level 1, 30-34 Hickson Road, Millers Point NSW 2000, Australia. ABN: 29 601 608 771. Tel: 1800 314 527. DYM-2018-0416. Date of preparation September 2018.


Issued by Cube on behalf of Mylan
. For further information please contact Kelly Smith on 0438 231 287 or Dani West on 0451 995 089.

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